Tag Archives: paper negatives

cyclone negative cyanotype

a couple of days ago i was making some more cyanotypes

i loaded up some contact frames with waxed negatives to see if

i could get a better print than i did with my old coated paper

some of those prints just didnt’ work out ..  and at the same time

i found an old hand coated paper negative made with the cyclone #3

a while ago, that was just sitting on the tabletop.  i had cleaned up quite a bit

a week or 2 ago:  i swept the floor;  i organized;  i put things away;  i stacked things;

i found things i hadn’t seen in a while.  the paper negative was a rediscovery, even though

it wasn’t really lost.  it seems like it was coated on xerox paper, it is thin and durable.  not sure

what emulsion is on it, maybe foma?  maybe my home-brew, not sure.  it has a nice contrast and look and

i stuck it in the contact frame.  the waxed negatives took a ton of time before to expose, so

i was banking on a day or 2 in the sun for all 3 of the cyanotypes.  it was a lot more diffuclt in late october because

the sun is low, and it moves across the sky differently than before, so i had to really follow the sun around with the print frames.

i did OK i suppose, but i was more in open shade than i was in the sun, and that is OK too.

the print is made from the same classic formula i coated the others with.  and after 2 days in the sun

i washed it in water and added a little hydrogen peroxide to finish the development, and eventually i painted

some areas of the print with dilute washing soda to give a yellowish hue to some areas.

anyhow, its the kitchen table and window and chairs.

not sure if i am going to add my own colors or leave it, the blue tones of cyanotypes are starting to grow on me.

 

classic, and blue

window table and chairs
classic cyanotype H2O2 to develop out faster as i always do, and a little washing soda to bleach and ad color

http://jnanian.imagekind.com/store/Images.aspx/e7b40dbc-7aba-4bf2-ae7f-355201cb53c4/RecentUploads

Posted in alternative process photography, images on hand coated paper, using vintage equipment Also tagged , , , , , , |

emulsive

i thought i posted a link to this but i guess it got away from me.

i was interviewed by emulsive.org a little while ago about film and emulsion and what i am up to.

in case you don’t know about emulsive org what i am up to here is the link

what’s emulsive.org ?  feel free to go there, its a pretty interesting site

well worth the click !

I am John Nanian and this is why I shoot film

Posted in film development technique, technique and style Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , |

hand tinted

this is a hand tinted image of a tree &c down the road from me.  it was made with either a 8×10 or 11×14 paper negative,

i can’t remember which one, but it was run through the empire state …  after scanning the image and inverting it, i added some colors.

hand tinted from large format paper negative

the wind blew at the coast, the leaves rustled and starlings flew away

Posted in technique and style Also tagged , |

more recent cyanotypes

if you have been reading my last few posts you probably know  i have been making cyanotypes.

what happened was i mixed a bunch of cyanotype chemistry and rather than get rid of it

i coated everyting i could find …  14×17 xerox paper, butcher paper, velum (pierce and bristol ? ) mailing envelopes

brown craft paper ..  some things work better than others …  i have done similar things with photo emulsion ..  just coated

what i could to see what worked and didn’t …  and to be honest i am thinking that sometimes the stuff didn’t work because

of how i use/ don’t use  whatever it is that i am using.  maybe it doesn’t like my negatives, maybe it doesn’t like my water source

or developer …

 

anyways  here are a few more waxed paper cyanotypes

hot off the skillet !

 

cropped

on the way to vezelay walking up the hill

barely bleached

central france walking to vezelay basilica

saran wrap

dead plant and clothespin, classic cyanotype

 

i think the age of the classic formula gives it a weirdish green tone when i develop it out.  the saran wrap gives a nice wavy texture.

the 2 waxed paper negatives are straight scans.  the negatives  are bleached a little bit to get rid of the blue, some areas turned brownish more.

the way i bleach is that i put less than a thumble full of water logged washing soda ( calcium carbonate ) in a big beaker of water and it dissolves readily,

then i pour the solution into the wash water and it dilutes as the tray drains ( it is a print washing tray i drilled holes in years ago for a water jacket )

a couple of fill and dumps the prints have bleached enough and i keep washing.

the print has an area on it that is stained from the wax, but it is just the border, and doesn’t bleed into the print.

the waxed negative prints i usually leave in direct sunlight ( sun blasting on the print frame ) for 8 hours.  sometimes i don’t move it in time so it gets open shade

or shady sunlight, sometimes it is shade before i remember to move it …  this time it started raining as i was exposing, so i brought in the frames and dried them and

the glass off, and put them back out in the sun the next day when i could.  some water leeched in under the glass and messed with the print along with the blotchy-ness from

the wax.  even thought some might view these as failures, and things i couldn’t do again if i tried, i see them as successes.  the waxed negative is great to work with

and sometimes partial development by rain while the image is exposing can lead to interesting results.

Posted in alternative process photography Also tagged , |

how you make waxed paper negatives

i’m no expert in this field, i’ve had fun making waxed negatives on and off for a few years.  it can be a messy job and it

might not work out very well.

 

i first saw how to make them by viewing a short video i found in the cyanotype group on flickr.  i’m not sure

if i am allowed to link to it here on my blog, but it was posted a while back in a discussion on using paper negatives for cyanotypes.

the  person who posted the video is james harr, and his work is fantastic.

here is a video link to how he explains waxing:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n7Fo8seMrFo

i dont’ do exactly as he describes.  i use cheap paraffin,  but still,  his post gave me enough information that i could improvise and have fun.

 

what i do is first get my paper negative.  i don’t have a xerox machine here, or a ink jet printer whose inks won’t smudge or a laser printer.  what i do is i invert whatever image it was in photo shop and put it on a canvas the size i want to have it printed.  most recently it was 4 images on 81/2×11 paper.

the images were digital files from a nikon d200, nothing fancy.  i just desaturated them and inverted them.  i don’t use chart throb or any other

programs to make my negatives i just by the bootstraps invert, cut/paste …  and to the copy store i went.

copies are cheap so i got a few of them knowing i might screw up.

i took a small cookie sheet and put it on the top of the stove to get hot to the touch and i put the xerox page in the pan …

then i take a block/rectangle of gulf wax paraffin and start rubbing .  the wax melts and i keep rubbing until the paper looks “wet”

i turn it over and do the same thing ..

then a piece of paper towel i rub as much of the excess of as i can.  it works OK but not very well, i still need to perfect my situation.

depending on how well you rub the wax it might streak or form a texture or just remain as a layer on the paper, that said, the paper

that was once white is now greyish and see-through ( sort of ).

i put the negatives one at a time in a small contact printing frame.  the cyanotype paper i am using was coated

IDK 7 months ago so i am not really sure how good or bad it is, it works so i guess it is OK.

i stick it in direct sunlight for as long as i can.  and move it around as the sun travels across the sky.

the wax usually stains the paper a little bit and bleeds but after a long sit in the sun, it seems to do whatever it is that it needs to do.

usually the receiving paper wtih cyanotype chemistry on it is very dark and over exposed.  there are really no details or very few details from

the negative.  but i wash it anyways.  i watch the image clear a little bit and a little bit more until whatever it was that i printed appears.

sometimes they look better than others …  after they clear and have been washed for 15 mins, or 35 mins, i put very dilute washing soda and water in the wash watger

and bleed some of the blue out of the image.  it turns a color of yellowish brown and a little greenish blue.

there are artifacts from the wax in the print and while sometimes they are distracting or might take away from the print

other times they give a layer of texture in the print that i like.

these are small, between 4×5 and 4×6 and i scan them.  and fix them a little bit with photoshop but i don’t do much.  i might boost the contrast/levels

a tiny bit, but that is what you do with any scan because of the scan process.  i also might remove a weird blotchy stain or weird artifact from using wax but i don’t really do too much to alter what is there.

 

here are a couple of my last ones i have done :

 

 

window sill detail, vezelay basilica, france

window sill detail, vezelay basilica, france

windmills and field

windmills and field

waxed paper negative from a digital file

waxed paper negative from a digital file

detail of arches, waxed negative

detail of arches, waxed negative

central france, paper negative

vezelay basilica central france, paper negative

 

 

as you can see, these prints can hold lots of detail or none at all,

and they are cheap + fun

Posted in alternative process photography Also tagged |

recent cyanotypes

just made a handful of cyanotypes lately using paper coated and left in a light safe

in a humid basement for the last 7 or 8 months.  the paper was not the best but it worked (sort of )

made some photograms ( some i watercolored ) i made a contact print with a waxed rubbing and tinted it in photoshop

and i also converted some digital images into black and white negatives on xerox paper and waxed and printed them.

i have some more negatives to print and cyanotype paper to use up before i mix new.

 

rubbing waxed negative

rubbing waxed negative

4 screwdrivers

photogram, watercolors

3 nails

photogram, watercolors

semicircle of stuff

photogram, watercolors

truck

waxed paper negative

vezelay

waxed paper negative

metal wire brush

photogram, watercolors

 

 

 

 

as usual most of my work is on imagekind ( jnanian.imagekind.com )  feel free to browse.  through the end of september

i will be donating a portion of every purchase ( 70% ) to relief efforts in louisana.

 

 

Posted in alternative process photography, images on hand coated paper, technique and style Also tagged , , , , , , , |

photo illustration sort of, PS colored photo reconstruction

a while back i made some paper negative from hand made emulsion

the negatives were more like a collage of things, images, textures, brush strokes.

i decided to scan big and crop small and the image i retrieved from the paper was a

sweet photograph of trees and a fencepost, but it always seemed to be missing something whenever

i looked at it.  i put it aside for a good 6 months and looked at it a little bit more once i had distance from it

 

railing and trees

railing and trees

 

the other day i spent a handful of hours working on it.

i enlarged the canvas,

i added colors ( which was i originally had hoped to do )

anyways, i worked and worked

added, and subtracted

and came up with this

 

 

cyclone

reworked image

it took hours, and it really still isn’t completely done,

but it was fun making something that never really existed.

Posted in alternative process photography, images on hand coated paper, liquid emulsion Also tagged , , , |

double coating paper

i dug into a 1 kg jar of foma emulsion the other day.  i know i can make my own but i have this still on hand so i might as well just use it until
i run out.  coating paper and glass and metal with it will be great practice for when i don’t want to waste stuff i spend time making on my own.  so i took
a few of the large sheets of xerox paper i had already coated.  i took 1 of them and with the lights on i exposed it in developer to show how poorly i coat.

it wasn’t that poor, it just wasn’t very good,  no it was pretty bad … it was  a lot of grey, only 1 area of black.

i’ve been coating things for years and this is the first time i did this …  that’s ok.  im a noob, even after 30 years.

i used a coating rod the last time, and a brush, but still things weren’t as good as i had hoped.  with denise ross’s book in hand, or at least in my mind
( if you haven’t gotten her blurb book and you like coating things, and making things, it is worth every penny you pay for it:  http://www.blurb.com/b/6465389-the-light-farm  ..)

i never thought about paper grain ( now i do )  i never thought about wet coating ( now i do ).

i took the remaining 2 sheets of paper and cut them into 4×5 pieces and soaked them in cold water.  this isn’t really what denise did in the book but that’s ok.  it is easy to tell
which side is emulsion and which isn’t ( the emulsion side is slippery ).  i took my squeegee and removed the water from the prints 1 at a time and with warm emulsion i re-coated each
piece of paper.  i looked at each piece in the safelight and they looked coated ( i guess they always do )  but coating 4×5 pieces was always easy for me, so my fingers are crossed that
the 2nd emulsion layer took.  i’ve coated cyanotypes 2x, and other stuff 2x but never wet.  i’m hoping denise’s invention and my twisting it for my own needs took.

i also took some sheets of regular paper and coated that stuff too.  1 sheet folds and cuts into 18 4x5s.  i’m still trying to figure out what it is.  i did a little research and it seems to be
“virgin” butcher paper.  uline sells it cut into the same size sheets or on a big roll.  alex art supply also sells something similar to it.  in both cases it isn’t the same weight (thickness) but
it seems similar enough that when i runout at least i will have something to buy.  smooth finish paper i like best for coating.  anyways, i cut 1 sheet up soaked and squeegeed it
and coated 14 pieces.  they are hanging on the line.

 

 

Posted in images on hand coated paper, liquid emulsion, technique and style Also tagged , , , |

hand coating xerox paper

i’ve been experimenting a little with hand coating a variety of different papers.  i have a stack of paper i was given 20 years ago that is slowly being  eaten away and i know i will need to find another something to coat.  i brought the paper to my print shop and local art stores ( locally we have a jerry’s artarama, dick blick and the risd store ).  no one could really tell me what it was but someone told me it seemed like butcher paper.  i looked around for a source and found a few places, i could get it on a big roll or separate 1/2 sheets.  uline has both sheets and rolls, alex art supply too.  its “virgin paper” so it doesn’t have the wax coating on it.  my local restaurant supply stores also have it too, in a big roll.  none of it was the same feel ( i got samples ) as the paper i have been using, but at least now i have a few leads.

a while back i bought a reem of 14×17 xerox paper that was acid free ( i am told it is ALL acid free ) .  i originally was using it to do rubbings which were waxed to print as silver prints or iron ones (cyanotypes) and it worked great, so i figured i would see how it held up with stuff coated on it.  i have a bunch of cyanotype emulsion coated on it, but haven’t exposed it yet, and i am wondering if i should bother.  i also coated 1 sheet with foma liquid emulsion and exposed it and just finished processing the negatives.  i love how smooth paper looks with emulsions on it.  most of the negatives look good but it came with a price.

the paper is VERY thin.  if azo or single weight printers think single weight paper is thin, they have never used xerox paper or thin japanese paper ( i’ll be using some of that next ).  a couple of pieces tore a little bit.  it wasn’t, too bad, maybe it was maybe because i am clumsy with rubber examination gloves on ( i hate using them ),  but it is something i worry about a little bit.  thin paper is weak when it is wet.

i also have a bunch of things i coated lately that i will be exposing and printing on.  i have some photo grade gelatin purchased from artcraft ( THEY ARE GREAT ! ) for my self made emulsion projects as i plug along.

so, this long ramble to say:  if you use xerox paper, be careful, its nice but it might be more trouble than it is worth.

Posted in images on hand coated paper, liquid emulsion Also tagged , |

a few photograms, with hand made emulsion

i love making photograms.  they only take a second, and they are a blast.

 

bulbs

inverted photogram
onion bulbs

 

spoon

hand made inverted photogram

Posted in images on hand coated paper, liquid emulsion Also tagged , , |

for some things, thin paper seems best

its been a week or two since i mixed up the emulsion,and started playing with it.  i’ve come to the conclusion

that this emulsion works likes thin smooth paper like the butcher paper that i use

thick velum paper i sometimes use for bottled emulsion paper negatives and cyanotypes don’t really provide a good negative for me with this emulsion,

maybe it is because i don’t use photo grade gelatin, maybe its because i didn’t coat the paper with gelatin first like a sub layer so the emulsion sits too far in the paper,

i’m not sure what it is, but the next coating sesison i do, i will coat more thin paper.  i do have some thicker sheets coated, i actually double coated everything to give me

better contrast.  i get OK contrast but some of the images just don’t work well.  i have some that worked well, but my success rate is not very high with thick paper.

ive been doing small test sheets, in a 35mm camera to get an idea of iso, and how the images look.  the emulsion is starting to get white and black speckles in it  so i have to

use it up before it goes bad, and then i will probably use up my bottled stash and make some more fresh emulsion soon after.

a few photographs from my efforts

 

delmar

tree in the wind, 25 seconds

crop

4×5 thick paper negative

same emulsion long exposure. the emulsion loves sunny windows

same emulsion long exposure. the emulsion loves sunny windows

trees and umbrella crop from a larger negative

trees and umbrella crop from a larger negative

80+ seconds hand held 35mm test frame

80+ seconds hand held
35mm test frame

Posted in alternative process photography, images on hand coated paper, liquid emulsion Also tagged , , , , |

paper negative fun with an empire state 1A

I’ve been on the lookout for a back for a camera i bartered for years ago.  the camera is a century 8 grande portrait outfit

 

century 8 portrait camera

 

(photograph courtesy of historic camera.com  a great website if you like looking at “old stuff” or want to see what you have )

http://www.historiccamera.com/cgi-bin/librarium/pm.cgi?action=display&login=century_8

anyways when i received the camera it came on an ornate semi centenial stand ( without the film holder rack ) and the camera came with an 8×10 back.  i eventually made a 11×14 back for the camera out of foam core and waxed paper, and a paper negative holder as well.  it worked like a dream.  i just had to load each sheet separately, no big deal unless i wanted to take more then one photograph.

eventually i purchased a 7×11 film back and holders which i mounted on what was the mount for the 8×10 back.  and that worked beautifully too, but like the 8×10 is about 1/2 the 11×14 negative, the 7×11 REALLY is half the size.  11×14 is such a giant negative i have wanted to get back to shooting that format for a long long time.

recently i found an inexpensive back and a couple of film holders.  if you have ever priced anything large format, you know inexpensive is a relative term.  about a year ago i found a back, broken and in pieces that someone wanted to sell to me for a more money than i had to spend.  i don’t have very much money so i passed and figured eventually i would find something a little more for someone with a shoestring budget.  well, it happened a few weeks ago.  i got a back and holders, and it came with a camera and a 8x1o back as well.  couldn’t have been happier seeing it cost less than the amount for something broken !

the camera arrived in the belly of a greyhound bus.  just don’t ship greyhound on holiday weeks where there is a lot of bus travel, people and their luggage get first priority.  i brought the giant box home and unpacked it.  about a day later i had the camera cleaned up.  after 10 years in a box in someone’s basement it got kind of dusty, and dirty.  i reglued parts of the film holders back together too.  it didn’t have a ground glass ( focusing screen ) so i went to the local home goods store and had a piece of plexi glass cut down to 11×14, and i sanded it and sanded it, and sanded it until it was scuffed up enough to work as a cheap piece of ground glass.  i figure if i sometimes use waxed paper scuffed plexiglass would work fine.  it cost me less than 12$ and about 5 mins of time and saved me probably 4-5 times that.  i clipped the corners and inserted the ground plexiglass.

first i made a retina image.  i  wanted to see if the film holders leaked or the bellows were a mess.

the image came out really nice, so i desaturated it, and added my own color since i like doing that sort of thing

 

2 hour exposure, expired photo paper

2 hour exposure, expired photo paper

the other day i decided to load up the other 11×14 film holder up with paper, and a a 8×10 too.

i made a few kitchen window photographs

 

 

onion and limes and dirty window

onion and limes and dirty window

15-20 seconds

scrubby and window light

 

with an assistant later in the day we made some portaits.

legs

legs

 

counting to 20

counting to 20

 

looking forward to taking the empire on the road, and using the back in-studio

Posted in Misc., using vintage equipment Also tagged , , |

3 paper negatives inverted

again with my paper negative tests

my dektol tests

my dektol + sumatra coffee developer split development tests

 

today i loaded film holders up and exposed the negatives in a more controlled environment.  i used

a graflex series D camera so i cold focus and have a better idea of the exposure than a box camera …

well — sort of.

i also took a light meter reading, something i haven’t done in probably 2 years.  i wanted to know the unknowns

and make exposures to see what was going on.   the first exposures was the middle one

the images were all taken through a window — i pointed the meter out and set to iso 6.  i read about 6 seconds @

f4.  so i focused and stopped down a teeny bit and counted to 8 seconds

the 2nd exposure ( far left ) stopped down a quarter turn and about 20-22 seconds

the 3rd exposure was a double exposure.  the first one stopped down more than 1/4 turn 20 seconds and then

wide open about 4 seconds.

not sure exactly what my fstops were because the lenshood blocks the numbers, i just know it wasn’ t f3.8 and it

wasn’t f 32 …

the prints were processed a the same exact time.

when the image appeared to come up i switched from dektol to caffenol then back in the dektol for a little boost in contrast

i scanned them and inverted them and just barely adjusted the levels.

my guess is the exposures and development were pretty much on target and the paper

hasn’t lost much contrast or gained much fog in 15 years since it is old and expired KODAK paper …

i wish it didn’t all have kodak professional paper watermarking the back of the paper, or i would contact print

the negatives into positive prints, the exposures look good for that too.

graflex paper negatives

dektol sumatranol split

 

even though this looks like 1 image, if you click on it you will see all 3

Posted in alternative process photography, technique and style Also tagged , , |

what did i mean by paper negative test?

i recently mentioned something about a paper negative test.

i suggested bracketing exposures and judging your negatives …

here, i have uploaded 3 images

 

the first

not photoshopped

cyclone #3 maybe f11

as the caption reads ..  it was taken with a cyclone #3 which i guess is around f11

light meter was set to iso 6 and it suggested  5 seconds

i count fast …  so i counted to 6.

the developer was 2 day old dektol, it is cold in my darkroom but the image appeared at around 20 sconds

so from previous experience, ( making prints in dektol ) i let it develop out fot at least 1 minute.

the negative looks ok.  there is a roundness to it because the lens has a big hot spot,

the edges are light the middle of the negative is dark.

the inversion ( #2 )

straight inversion, of a straight scan

f 11 6 seconds 15 year old polymax rc

the inverted positive looks OK

( kodak paper has writing on the back so i don’t bother contact printing kodak paper negatives )

the center of the image is light, the sides are dark, the background blown out.

this is expected.

today was an overcast day

this was about 145pm

the sky has a lot of blue light but where i was ..  was filtered a little so my meter gave me

a false reading.  for the deck where i was it was OK, the wood, the deck chairs and flower pots

seem to be OK exposed  …  if i was to multiple expose or burn in .. while making the exposure

i would under expose the sky and trees

with a little PS – love

it doesn’t look much different ..

i adjusted the woods a little bit, evened out a little bit the roundness and brightness / contrast

brightness, lightness burning in selective contrast

cyclone might have needed an extra few seconds for the woods
maybe burn in ..

 

next exposure will be tomorrow …

maybe i will try 6 seconds and in camera dodge out the sky

the developer might be a little easier to work with too …

Posted in photographs, technique and style, using vintage equipment Also tagged , |

paper negatives

some people hate paper negatives.

they have trouble with them because they don’t realize how they need to be exposed

and treat them like film.  they develop them like regular prints, and think that a “beefy” paper negative will print great like a “beefy negative”.

photo paper is not film, it isn’t sensitive to the same light as film and its sensitivity changed.

what does this mean ?

in a simple way of putting it is  film is panchromatic, so it is sensitive to red, green blue light.

think of it as being  sensitive to all light …and unless you are using color film, light is light.

photo paper is sensitive to blue light, and sometimes to green light.  different times of the day, different light conditions

(shade, open shade, bright sunlight, cloudy day &c ) different amounts of blue light are around, so

even though it might seem “bright” it might not be …  this might not make much sense.  but you can do a little experiment.

if you have a “hot light”  the old fashioned ones that use tungsten bulbs make an exposure with that bulb as your light source, and then

use a different light source, maybe a CF bulb that has mostly red in it …  and make the same exposure with your paper…  you might notice

one negative “better” than the other.  its also the reason at least with multi contrast papers why you can use filters to adjust the contrast of the image …

anyways, photo paper might be fast in one light condition and slow in another, AND different manufacturers use different light sensitive emulsions

on their paper so they will have different “speeds” too.  you might see speeds listed on the box of paper, they are not the same as film speeds, but

only relative to the paper.   as a point of reference, regular photo paper typically has a iso ( asa ) relative to film about 6, sometimes as high as 25

if you plan on shooting paper negatives, its best to do exposure tests .    bracket exposures, like you would for film,

and take notes if that is your sort of thing.  years ago there were oodles of papers on the market, and i did paper exposures for maybe 15 different ones

these days there aren’t as many so it might be a little easier.

developer  …

you should develop your paper negatives the same way you develop your prints ” to completion”  …  don’t pull the print out of the developer when

“it looks right”  because you won’t get a good print, just like you won’t get a good negative.  contrast comes out first then the mid tones afterwards.

a beefy negative or a thin one …

i guess it all depends on what the negative will be used for.  will you make a contact print with it ?  will you scan and invert it ?  will you make a sun print with it?

if you plan on contact printing your paper negatives thin ones sometimes work best, too dense it is hard for the light to pass through and you will get a thin positive print.

if you plan on scanning and inverting, a dense negative might suite your needs ..  i guess it depends on how good your photoshop skills are.

sun prints are a bit different.  it takes a long time for the sun’s light to pass through the photo paper.  i have waxed the negative with paraffin and made it

somewhat translucent and light passed through a bit easier.  i can’t help you there, you have to experiment to see what works best for your situation.

 

 

why do i like paper negatives ?

photo paper is cheap compared to film, and it is instant compared to film.  i find exposing paper negatives

whether they are negatives i coated by hand with liquid or home made emulsion or in a box to be more fun …

there is a sense of the unknown sometimes … with film, you pretty much know what you are going to get  …

also, i would rather make a long exposure than an instant one …  while instantaneous fraction of a second exposures have their place

portraits of fidgety kids, maybe pet photography, large groups where everyone seems to be moving, sports, science / nature photography

there is a thing about long exposures that almost makes a scene or person come to life  …  but that is another entry for another time.

Posted in alternative process photography, photographs, technique and style Also tagged , , |